Climate Change Blog Posts


On Environmental Justice, Climate Justice, and Ocean Justice

March 30, 2021

On November 30th, 2020, the UC Davis Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute welcomed Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson as the first speaker in our Climate Justice Seminar Series. Dr.






Species Resilience and Science Advocacy: Getting to Know the Whitehead Lab at UC Davis

December 03, 2020
Written by Nicole Drake In the lab

Genetics, climate change, and conservation become highly intertwined in Dr. Andrew Whitehead’s lab. Although he works on a variety of research endeavors, he mainly focuses on how wild species respond to human-induced stress, such as the effects of climate change, and how that may affect an individual organism’s progeny. Essentially, Dr. Whitehead attempts to monitor how climate change and pollution will shape the genetic makeup of multiple generations.






Mathematics and Kelp Collide in California’s Coastal Waters

September 28, 2020

Written by: Jessica Ramos






Will Mussel Aquaculture Be Viable Along The California Coast?

March 05, 2019

By Priya Shukla

Mussels are found the world over. Many native freshwater mussels are admired for their ability to clean our streams and rivers, while invasive ones (which are actually clams masquerading as mussels!) are reviled for voraciously eating plankton and clogging pipes. The shells and tissues of mussels are often used as monitoring instruments because they reliably record changes in the surrounding environment.






Empathy as a Universal Language

November 06, 2018

By Ashley Collier Smart

In spite of the environmental disasters that are caused by mining and burning coal, I cannot help but be at least a little fond of it, if only for selfish reasons. For the last 300 years, coal work has provided a livelihood for my relatives—I have the family name of Collier to attest to this fact. During an age when people adopted their trade as a last name my relatives were employed as Colliers, or coal miners. I come from a line of Colliers dating back to the 1700’s with relatives working in coal in western Europe before immigrating to America.