Conservation

Saving White Abalone with UC Davis Project Scientist Kristin Aquilino

November 18, 2019

UC Davis project scientist Kristin Aquilino directs the Bodega Marine Laboratory's white abalone captive breeding program. In this video, she discusses the work she and her colleagues are doing to bring the endangered species back from the brink of extinction. This week marks the first time captive bred white abalone will be released to the ocean in hopes of saving the species.

An Undersea Forest In Decline

November 15, 2019

Envision California’s lush forests from San Francisco to the Oregon border. Now imagine that 90 percent of those forests disappear within two years. Laura Rogers-Bennett, senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, says that’s exactly what happened to underwater kelp forests off Northern California’s coastline from 2014-16.

Read more & listen to the piece on Science Friday

Endangered White Abalone Program Yields Biggest Spawning Success Yet

April 25, 2019

Millions of Eggs Bring Program 1 Step Closer to Saving Species

The Bodega Marine Laboratory’s white abalone program has millions of new additions following its most successful spawning ever at the University of California, Davis, facility. Three out of nine recently collected wild white abalone spawned last week, as did seven of 12 captive-bred white abalone. One wild female was particularly generous, producing 20.5 million eggs herself.

Discovering Curiosity: Saving the White Abalone with Kristin Aquilino

November 07, 2018

For the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences: A UC Davis alumna, Kristin Aquilino directs the Bodega Marine Laboratory's white abalone captive breeding program. In 2001, the marine snail was officially listed as endangered. Using captive breeding, Aquilino and colleagues hope to bring the species back from the brink of extinction.

Read more here

Large Stretches of Coral Reefs Can Be Rehabilitated

September 27, 2018

New ‘Spider’ Technique Found to Help Coral Reefs

Even after being severely damaged by blast fishing and coral mining, coral reefs can be rehabilitated over large scales using a relatively inexpensive technique, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, in partnership with Mars Symbioscience.

Abalone Collapse with Kelp Forests

November 29, 2017

The giant sea snails, which eat seaweed and kelp, have been left with little to eat after the North Coast's kelp forests collapsed during the past three years. Now, hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of abalone are dead or starving. 

Read more here

Will climate change ruin the white abalone's last chance at survival?

September 25, 2017

UC Davis' very own Kristin Aquilino, a project scientist at Bodega Marine Laboratory,  is in charge of the largest population of endangered white abalone that exists in the world. Her work focuses on a long-term goal is to build the population in captivity, then outplant them into the wild and hope to increase a stable population. However, is there even a chance for them to survive back in the wild with dramatic changes in ocean chemistry due to climate change? 

Study Reveals Evolutionary History of Imperiled Salmon Stock

August 16, 2017

A study led led by the University of California, Davis, shows that there is a new technology that can help to transform how imperiled species are considered and managed for conservation protection. These technologies can be applied to a wide range of species around the world — from mushrooms to walruses — but the study focuses on two iconic species of Pacific salmon: steelhead and chinook. With the help of these new genetic technologies, there can be used to improve conservation strategies and determinine how to prioritize populations for protection under the Endangered Species Act.